Feed Me Vegan Episode 11 – Fun with Fermentation

What? Fermentation? That’s right! Fermented foods are incredibly healthy for the gut, helping to increase the good bacteria why eliminating the bad.  Join Chelsea, Ryan, and special guest Nathan Huerkamp of Punk Rawk Labs for episode 11: Fun with Fermentation, where they make homemade sauerkraut and kimchi, featured on Tofurky brats. 

Feed Me Vegan is a program of Animal Rights Coalition’s Vegan University. See below for links to their organization, recipes, and companies/products mentioned during the show! 

http://animalrightscoalition.com
http://animalrightscoalition.com/prog
https://www.facebook.com/FeedMeVeganS

Recipes:
Grandma’s Sauerkraut
1 Med Cabbage, reserve good outer leaves and chop
Course Sea Salt
*Ratio of about 5 lbs. of cabbage to 3 T. of Course Sea Salt (roughly 2%); another way to look at it is 100 grams of cabbage to 2 grams of salt, which is going to fill a quart canning jar.

Brine
If brine is necessary, then use purified water
*Use either as weight in a canning jar and/or to cover cabbage after 24 hours
1 C. Purified Water
1 tsp. Course Sea Salt

Directions
Rinse, remove outer layers and then chop cabbage. The thicker it is the longer it takes to ferment. Your choice. Layer cabbage in a non-reactive container (glass or ceramic is best), sprinkle with sea salt and punch down with your fist or use a wooden tamper to accelerate osmosis. Repeat until all cabbage and sea salt is in the container, next place outer leaves on top to keep cut cabbage from moving around. Wipe down sides and rim of the container if necessary.

Use a dish and/or canning jar filled with brine as a weight. Leave several inches of room between the top layer of cabbage to the top of container rim, so your weight can do its work without causing overflow. Lay a clean flour sack or other cotton cloth over the container. This will keep out the bugs and such. Place in cool, dark spot. Clear jars are quite fun to have because you get to watch the anaerobic action!

Punch and mix with clean hands after admiring the bubbling ferment 1-2 times a day. If after 24 hours the natural brine from the cabbage does not cover the cabbage fully simply make your own brine, as described above, and add some to your ferment. This process usually takes 4 days to a week (depends on cabbage thickness, the time of year and temperature). Keep under 75 degrees F. Colder it is the longer it will take and the deeper the flavor will become. Remember to taste cabbage after several days and continue to do so until you like where it’s at, then place in fridge or keep in very cool and dark place, such as a root cellar if you are lucky enough to have one!
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Radish Kimchi
1 Med Daikon, or other types of radish, cubed
1 Lrg or 2 Sm Carrots, diced
2-4 Garlic Clove, minced
1 T. Hot Red Pepper Flakes
1 tsp. Ginger, minced *optional
1-2 Green Onion Tops, chopped *optional

Brine
2 C. Purified Water
2 T. Course Sea Salt
*Extra Course Sea Salt for drawing out water from radish

A secondary option to the weight is to use an airlock fitted for your canning jar.

Directions
Rinse, peel radish, remove ends and then chop or dice (1″ to a 1/4″). Place in strainer and sprinkle with sea salt. Let osmosis take its course for about half an hour. In the meantime rinse, peel carrot, remove ends and then dice. Next smash garlic cloves, remove skin and ends, then mince. Rinse, drain and pat dry salted radish. Mix all ingredients, except the brine, in a bowl. Finally, spoon all of the radish mixture into a canning jar and pour brine over top so everything is covered. Leave at least an inch of space between brine and the canning jar rim. Place tiny bowl on top, then canning jar lid, flour sack or cotton cloth and finally the plate. Otherwise use secondary option, airlocks are so cool!

This process usually takes 3 days to a week (depends on radish thickness, the time of year and temperature). Keep under 75 degrees F. Colder it is the longer it will take and the deeper the flavor will become. Remember to taste radish after several days and continue to do so until you like where it’s at, then place in fridge or keep in very cool and dark place, such as a root cellar if you are lucky enough to have one!

We hope you enjoy this fun fermentation process! 

Alex Beane

Alex is a freelance writer who holds a BA in Professional and Creative Writing. She has a strong interest in veganism, holistic health, and emotional and physical wellbeing. When she isn’t reading and writing about health and wellness, Alex is trying new plant based recipes in the kitchen or can be found volunteering with a Minneapolis-based animal rights organization or local rabbit rescue. Find Alex on LinkedIn or view her writing portfolio.